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Going Nuclear on Judge Gorsuch

Time will tell whether a transparently qualified judge like Mr. Neil Gorsuch can get 60 votes in today's ultra-politicized Senate. In a more sane environment, his résumé and experience would easily translate into 90-something votes. But Senate Democrats, egged on by their frothing-at-the-mouth Trump-hating voters, are abandoning all reason this year, and it's looking increasingly likely that Republicans are willing to "go nuclear" and change Senate rules so that a simple majority will be enough to elevate Gorsuch to the Supreme Court.

Admittedly, Senate Democrats are under such incredible pressure from the left that it looks highly unlikely that Mr. Gorsuch will get even a single vote from anyone with a "D" next to their name. Still it bears saying: shame on red-state Democrats if Mr. Gorsuch cannot get one of them to vote "yes."

Senate Democrats are under such incredible pressure from the left that it looks highly unlikely that Mr. Gorsuch will get even a single vote from anyone with a "D" next to their name.

There's only one reasonable move for Republicans to make: it's time to nuke the Senate Democrats.

As much as Majority Leader Mitch McConnell may abhor it, the nuclear option is looking more likely by the day:

Democrats "are in no position to ask for any sort of a deal on anything," said Sen. Chuck Grassley, chairman of the Judiciary Committee. He's absolutely right.

Even such Republican defenders of Senate rules as Sen. Lindsey Graham has said that he would support the nuclear option to confirm Gorsuch.

"If they [Democrats] filibuster him, it means there's nobody a Republican could pick that they could support. That means they're telling Trump they don't recognize him as president," Graham said. "... I'm not going to play that game and let them use the traditions of the Senate when they choose to and grab power when they want to."

Purists may yet try to defend the 60-vote rule. But more and more Republicans have grown increasingly frustrated with it.

In theory, it was intended to encourage people to come together or create consensus. More recently, it has become an obstacle to good governance, such as when it kept the U.S. Senate from having a say on President Obama's egregiously flawed Iran deal. And it has made it virtually impossible to approve good judges like Neil Gorsuch.

So let's do it. Let's nuke the Senate Democrats and move on.